Reporting

With over two decades of experience in impact and ESG investing, we have seen many types of impact reports. We too have adapted and improved our impact reporting over the years based on client feedback, internal discussions, and enhanced metrics and outcomes. We are honored that so many recent entries into the impact arena have followed our lead and published impact reports on their activities.

As a pioneer in impact and ESG investing, CCM has created a proprietary impact model and reporting system where we track and monitor the positive impact and ESG attributes of every investment. Clients meeting minimum customization requirements receive quarterly impact and financial reports detailing a variety of impact metrics and outcomes. Our impact reports include a mix of quantitative data and qualitative details, also known as “impact stories.” We believe that these stories truly capture the impact outcomes of the investments by providing a powerful overview of how these investments are making positive contributions to society.

Impact Stories

We enjoy sharing impact stories from the investments we have made on behalf of clients across the nation. Our investment analysis requires on-going monitoring from both a financial and an impact perspective. One of the best ways to supplement the on-going monitoring efforts of the research team is to encourage employees to visit properties that have benefited from investments we have made. Below we have highlighted details of some visits that took place over the last few years. To obtain impact investment examples in your geography or with a specific impact theme, please email Iza Daguila at idaguila@ccminvests.com.

Latest Insights

Black Homeownership Gap

For millions, owning a home remains at the heart of the American dream but many Black Americans have been left out. Read more in our latest report.

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Impact and ESG Investing Survey

Download our latest survey to hear how investors are evaluating impact investments, conducting due diligence on managers, and more.

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2020 Impact Report

Our 2020 impact report covers many topics including CCM's history, how the firm measures, monitors, and tracks its impact investments, and recent impact stories.

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About

The Elizabeth Seton Pediatric Center was established in 1987 by the Sisters of Charity of New York. It was founded to provide specialized clinical and rehabilitative services to medically complex children with multiple physical and neurological conditions and disabilities. In March of 2012, the Center relocated from Manhattan to a brand new, state-of-the-art facility in Yonkers, NY. This 165,000 square foot complex serves 137 of New York State’s most medically complex children.

Impact

The loan to Elizabeth Seton Pediatric Center helped finance the construction and expansion of the Center to accommodate 32 additional children who are dependent on ventilators. The three-story addition enables the facility to serve a total of 50 ventilator-dependent children and brings the total number of children served by the Center to 169. In addition, the on-site John A. Coleman School added more classrooms to educate these new residents. With the expansion, the Center has hired an additional 100+ employees. The Center is also committed to the environment through its green initiative and building design. The Yonkers facility has been awarded a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold Certification.

On-Site Visit

In 2016, David Sand, chief investment strategist, went on a tour and was impressed with the Center, its level of care for the children, and its commitment to the environment. He learned about the many services offered including clinical, rehabilitation, palliative care, and creative arts therapies.

Impact Themes

A

Affordable Health
and Rehabilitation Care

E

Education and
Childcare

E

Enterprise Development and
Jobs

E

Environmental
Sustainability

About

Built on what was once a set of vacant lots, home to drug crime, foreclosures, and crumbling houses, Hawthorne Eco Village Apartments is an affordable rental property in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Located in a low-income, majority-minority, and high-poverty census tract, Hawthorne Eco Village is anticipated to help revitalize the Lyndale and Lowry intersection and be a catalyst for additional housing development in the area. The development of Hawthorne Eco Village Apartments used best practices in community-based development, neighborhood revitalization, and sustainable green development to create a model for healthier and more stable, livable communities.

Impact

Project for Pride in Living (PPL) built and manages the property. The 75 units at Hawthorne Eco Village are part of over 1,300 units of safe, quality, affordable housing built and managed by PPL throughout the Twin Cities available to households making less than 60% of the area median income. In addition to affordable housing, PPL also provides no cost employment readiness services for residents and the greater community. Other property and features and amenities include a green roof, playground for children, fitness room, and community garden. Up to four of the apartments will be set aside for those experiencing long-term homelessness and earning at or below 30% of the area median income.

On-Site Visit

In 2019, Alyssa Greenspan, president and COO, visited Hawthorne Eco Village and met with Joanne Kosciolek, vice president for development and internal affairs at PPL, which developed the property. In Alyssa’s words: “I was so impressed by the spacious apartments and the amenities including a fun playground area; a rooftop garden to prevent run-off; exercise room; bicycle storage; and a community garden for growing fresh fruits and vegetables. The development has helped revitalize the neighborhood with affordable workforce housing, an increase in retail stores, and the addition of affordable single family homes.”

Impact Themes

A

Affordable Housing

E

Education and Childcare

E

Enterprise Development and Jobs

E

Environmental Sustainability

H

Healthy Communities

H

Human Empowerment

M

Minority Advancement

N

Neighborhood Revitalization

P

Poverty Alleviation

T

Transit-Oriented Development

About

Henry Greene Apartments is an affordable rental property in Louisville where 124 of the 125 units receive Section 8 assistance. Henry Greene Apartments is in a low-income, high-minority, and high-poverty census tract. Most of the population residing in this census tract are minority households and live below the poverty line.

Impact

In 2019, the property began a $17.5 million renovation that included energy efficiency and safety changes. Those changes included more lighting outside, better walkways, and upgraded appliances. The apartments remained affordable during the upgrade and residents were not displaced. The property is in the Russell neighborhood, which is going through a revitalization that includes a new, mixed-income housing development, a new YMCA, and a new multi-sport facility developed by the Louisville Urban League.

On-Site Visit

In 2020, Jamie Horwitz, chief marketing officer, and James Malone, chief financial and diversity officer, visited the property. In their words: “We were surprised when we learned that Henry Greene Apartments was only a 10-minute drive from the beautiful downtown hotel where the conference we were at was being held. It was quite a dichotomy to go from the city center to another part of town – literally just down the road – and see another side of Louisville. The neighborhood had the feel of an older, historic area that appeared to have been run down over the years, but one where we could see pockets of reinvestment. The apartment complex was on a quiet block, and the multi-sport facility was under construction. We are hopeful that these important affordable complexes, upgrades, and neighborhood revitalization plans will help the community grow and thrive.”

Impact Themes

A

Affordable Housing

H

Healthy Communities

E

Environmental Sustainability

M

Minority Advancement

About

Wilshire Towers is an affordable rental property for seniors in Los Angeles County, California with 287 total units where 98% of the units receive Section 8 assistance. The property is located in a low-income, high-minority, and high-poverty census tract. The majority of the population residing in this census tract are minority households (87%) and 32% of the population lives below the poverty line. 

Impact

In the last few years, the property underwent extensive renovations including upgrades to all resident units as well as a fully remodeled community room, gym, library, and new laundry facilities. Wilshire Towers is conveniently located in the heart of Koreatown, close to downtown Los Angeles, and near public transportation including the Metro purple line. Wilshire Towers has a Walk Score of 96 which is considered a walker’s paradise, where daily errands do not require a car. In addition, this address scored a 79 for its Transit Score, indicating public transit is convenient for most trips. 

On-Site Visit

In 2019, Martha Schuman, senior client portfolio manager, visited the property. In Martha’s words: “The Wilshire Towers was my first experience visiting an affordable housing project and it really changed my perception of affordable housing. The building is located in the Koreatown neighborhood of Los Angeles, a rapidly gentrifying area of the city. From the outside, the building looked like a nice apartment complex found in any major city. Inside, the residents have beautiful gardens with a koi pond, exercise facilities, and a well-equipped common area, all within walking distance to bus stops for medical appointments or shopping. I also saw the pride the on-site manager had in caring for the facility and the warmth the residents greeted him with while touring the property. I enjoyed my time meeting with several of the people that live in Wilshire Towers and seeing first-hand the impact it has on their lives. It was truly a rewarding experience.”

Impact Themes

A

Affordable Housing

E

Environmental Sustainability

H

Healthy Communities

M

Minority Advancement

S

Seniors and the Disabled

T

Transit-Oriented Development